1. Oct 17
     Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time or Screen Time?
For years, child development experts have advised parents to read to their children early and often. On the other hand, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under 2 have no screen time.
See the Beauty of Everyday Life through This Mom’s Eyes
“Every moment, no matter how small, are granted for purposes we can’t see.”
Watch This Singing Dad Get Caught Off Guard
Dad is all smiles when he realizes he is being recorded.
13 Things Second-Time Parents Know To Be True
#11: Your life has double the cuteness…
Mom Captures a Special Part of Childhood in ‘Comfort Objects’ Photo Series
As a mom of three, photographer Anna Ream is no stranger to the concept of “comfort objects” — the blankets, stuffed animals, dolls and other items that children latch on to for emotional release and support.

    Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time or Screen Time?

    For years, child development experts have advised parents to read to their children early and often. On the other hand, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under 2 have no screen time.

    See the Beauty of Everyday Life through This Mom’s Eyes

    “Every moment, no matter how small, are granted for purposes we can’t see.”

    Watch This Singing Dad Get Caught Off Guard

    Dad is all smiles when he realizes he is being recorded.

    13 Things Second-Time Parents Know To Be True

    #11: Your life has double the cuteness…

    Mom Captures a Special Part of Childhood in ‘Comfort Objects’ Photo Series

    As a mom of three, photographer Anna Ream is no stranger to the concept of “comfort objects” — the blankets, stuffed animals, dolls and other items that children latch on to for emotional release and support.

  2. Oct 10
     Laugh at These Silly Baby Photos
Somehow, they still manage to look cute.
The Biggest Culprit in Distracting Parents Is…
Whether parents are making a work call that can’t wait, checking Facebook or dashing off an email, kids certainly notice when it feels like Mom and Dad are a million miles away.
Adorable 4-Year-Old Baffled by Nursery Rhyme
Line, please?
When Your Children Love A Book As Much As You Did
Remember that book that was so loved that its cover consisted mostly of scotch tape and bent cardboard?
Playgrounds You’ll Wish Existed When You Were a Kid
Get an insider’s look at the most fascinating, colorful, engaging and all-out fantastical playgrounds.

    Laugh at These Silly Baby Photos

    Somehow, they still manage to look cute.

    The Biggest Culprit in Distracting Parents Is…

    Whether parents are making a work call that can’t wait, checking Facebook or dashing off an email, kids certainly notice when it feels like Mom and Dad are a million miles away.

    Adorable 4-Year-Old Baffled by Nursery Rhyme

    Line, please?

    When Your Children Love A Book As Much As You Did

    Remember that book that was so loved that its cover consisted mostly of scotch tape and bent cardboard?

    Playgrounds You’ll Wish Existed When You Were a Kid

    Get an insider’s look at the most fascinating, colorful, engaging and all-out fantastical playgrounds.

  3. Oct 3
     After-School Exercise May Improve Kids’ Thinking Skills
Children who participated in a physical activity program after school did better on thinking tasks than kids who didn’t take part in the program, according to a new study.
Enjoy Heartwarming Photos of Kids Playing with Cats 
Cats are cute. Kids are cute. But when cats and kids get together to play, they are cuter than the sum of their parts.Parenting on Instagram Vs. Parenting in Real Life
What a cute photo of your child being artistic…all over her little sister.
Optimism: The Silver Lining in a Chaotic World
Some days, it all feels like too much.
Huuuurh! Watch This Baby Flex Her Muscles with Dad
She’s only 8 months old, but baby Hadley is already one tough girl. Here’s proof.

 

    After-School Exercise May Improve Kids’ Thinking Skills

    Children who participated in a physical activity program after school did better on thinking tasks than kids who didn’t take part in the program, according to a new study.

    Enjoy Heartwarming Photos of Kids Playing with Cats

    Cats are cute. Kids are cute. But when cats and kids get together to play, they are cuter than the sum of their parts.

    Parenting on Instagram Vs. Parenting in Real Life

    What a cute photo of your child being artistic…all over her little sister.

    Optimism: The Silver Lining in a Chaotic World

    Some days, it all feels like too much.

    Huuuurh! Watch This Baby Flex Her Muscles with Dad

    She’s only 8 months old, but baby Hadley is already one tough girl. Here’s proof.

     

  4. Oct 1
    Optimism: The Silver Lining in a Chaotic World   When I rock a baby in my arms, the world just seems right.
Will somebody bring me a rocking chair and a baby to borrow so the world rights itself again? Lately, the world seems like a pretty crazy place.
In my (literal) neck of the woods, law enforcement is searching for a survivalist who allegedly shot a state trooper. On television, we see footage of airstrikes against a terrorist group that commits unspeakable acts to innocent people. Wildfires rage in the west, destroying homes.
Some days, it all feels like too much. Some days, I just want to cover my ears and sing: “La, la, la!” Better yet, I want to cover the ears and eyes of children. Oh, how I hope parents are protecting their young children from inappropriate media exposure!
How do we shield our children from news of these horrific events? Is it even possible? I talk to a colleague whose kindergartner has missed several days of school while the manhunt for the shooter in the woods ensues. Her little guy wants to know why he has to stay home. She has no choice but to tell him — because she wants him to hear it in her words, not in the words of other children in the neighborhood and on the bus. But what, exactly, should those words be? Certainly, it’s harder to assure our children they are safe when we are in need of a little reassurance ourselves.
Of course, the well-known message from Mister Rogers is always a good one to share with young children in times of trouble: “Look for the helpers.” It’s a beautiful sentiment — simple and true. Wherever there is pain and strife, there are helpers. I’ve used this quote with my children, and I know that it comforted them. It’s reassuring — and it’s optimistic.
It’s important for kids to feel optimistic. An optimistic kid is a resilient kid, and in today’s increasingly complicated world, our children need resilience.
The good news is that optimism may not be a hard-wired trait, as we tend to think. Some researchers say that our ability to be optimistic is influenced by a combination of our DNA, our personal experiences and how we remember or interpret those experiences. Optimism, it seems, can be learned. 
Maybe that’s the silver lining of a chaotic world: the important reminder that we need to teach our children optimism — and work to nurture it on an ongoing basis. Here are some suggestions for doing so:
Resolve every day to set a calm, positive tone in your home. Tamp down expressions of negativity and stress. Invite your kids at dinner time to tell you one happy thing that happened to them that day — or name one thing for which they’re grateful.
Know that setting a positive tone doesn’t mean censoring conversation. If your child seems to want to discuss the frightening things he or she sees and hears, by all means, do. But lean in and listen, and take your cue from the kids. Don’t assume they want a full download of information. Often, all they really need to hear is that they’re safe and it’s all going to work out.
Do monitor your child’s exposure to the news. The younger or more sensitive the child, the more protective you need to be. Talk with older children about what they read and hear.
Share good-news stories with your children — stories of people helping people. Kids need to understand that the world is not evil, although there is evil in the world. Volunteer as a family. Practice random acts of kindness. When kids see that they, too, can make a difference, optimism takes root.
Have more fun at home. Be silly. Play games. Tell jokes. This will make you feel better, too. My husband and I went to a comedy show recently. I was startled to realize how great I felt after 45 minutes of belly laughs!
And it never hurts to rock a baby.

  Posted By Christine F. Cully

    Optimism: The Silver Lining in a Chaotic World

       

    When I rock a baby in my arms, the world just seems right.

    Will somebody bring me a rocking chair and a baby to borrow so the world rights itself again? Lately, the world seems like a pretty crazy place.

    In my (literal) neck of the woods, law enforcement is searching for a survivalist who allegedly shot a state trooper. On television, we see footage of airstrikes against a terrorist group that commits unspeakable acts to innocent people. Wildfires rage in the west, destroying homes.

    Some days, it all feels like too much. Some days, I just want to cover my ears and sing: “La, la, la!” Better yet, I want to cover the ears and eyes of children. Oh, how I hope parents are protecting their young children from inappropriate media exposure!

    How do we shield our children from news of these horrific events? Is it even possible? I talk to a colleague whose kindergartner has missed several days of school while the manhunt for the shooter in the woods ensues. Her little guy wants to know why he has to stay home. She has no choice but to tell him — because she wants him to hear it in her words, not in the words of other children in the neighborhood and on the bus. But what, exactly, should those words be? Certainly, it’s harder to assure our children they are safe when we are in need of a little reassurance ourselves.

    Of course, the well-known message from Mister Rogers is always a good one to share with young children in times of trouble: “Look for the helpers.” It’s a beautiful sentiment — simple and true. Wherever there is pain and strife, there are helpers. I’ve used this quote with my children, and I know that it comforted them. It’s reassuring — and it’s optimistic.

    It’s important for kids to feel optimistic. An optimistic kid is a resilient kid, and in today’s increasingly complicated world, our children need resilience.

    The good news is that optimism may not be a hard-wired trait, as we tend to think. Some researchers say that our ability to be optimistic is influenced by a combination of our DNA, our personal experiences and how we remember or interpret those experiences. Optimism, it seems, can be learned.

    Maybe that’s the silver lining of a chaotic world: the important reminder that we need to teach our children optimism — and work to nurture it on an ongoing basis. Here are some suggestions for doing so:

    • Resolve every day to set a calm, positive tone in your home. Tamp down expressions of negativity and stress. Invite your kids at dinner time to tell you one happy thing that happened to them that day — or name one thing for which they’re grateful.
    • Know that setting a positive tone doesn’t mean censoring conversation. If your child seems to want to discuss the frightening things he or she sees and hears, by all means, do. But lean in and listen, and take your cue from the kids. Don’t assume they want a full download of information. Often, all they really need to hear is that they’re safe and it’s all going to work out.
    • Do monitor your child’s exposure to the news. The younger or more sensitive the child, the more protective you need to be. Talk with older children about what they read and hear.
    • Share good-news stories with your children — stories of people helping people. Kids need to understand that the world is not evil, although there is evil in the world. Volunteer as a family. Practice random acts of kindness. When kids see that they, too, can make a difference, optimism takes root.
    • Have more fun at home. Be silly. Play games. Tell jokes. This will make you feel better, too. My husband and I went to a comedy show recently. I was startled to realize how great I felt after 45 minutes of belly laughs!

    And it never hurts to rock a baby.

    Posted By Christine F. Cully
  5. Sep 30
    Parenting Perspectives: Manners   Two parents offer different views on the subject of manners.
More Manners, Please!
Do manners still matter? Of course they do — now more than ever before!
Perhaps sometimes the disagreement on this topic is in the details. When you think of teaching children manners, what do you think of first — teaching them to use the proper fork for fish, or teaching them to react to others with empathy and warmth? The manners that truly matter are those that help children to succeed, and to live richer and kinder lives.
The importance of manners is a topic that receives serious attention from experts like Dr. Pier Forni, co-founder of the Civility Project at Johns Hopkins University, which examines the significance of civility, manners and politeness in contemporary society; and Dr. Berry Brazelton, noted pediatrician, author and Director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.
 [[MORE]]Dr. Forni told The Washington Post, “The rules of good manners are the traffic lights of human interaction. They make it so that we don’t crash into one another in everyday behavior.”
Our distant ancestors developed behaviors to show others respect, fairness and kindness. Those, in turn, have evolved into today’s manners. “You cannot have any kind of community if there are not some rules,” Forni said.  
In an article from the Deseret News, Dr. Brazelton echoes Dr. Forni’s comments. “In past generations, teaching a child manners was an important part of early training,” he said. “Manners still matter… but children today may be cheated of the opportunities to think generously about others. We are all in a hurry, and most families are stressed. Manners may be left out or forgotten. This is unfortunate. I always urge parents to start in early childhood to teach manners and model demonstrations of respect for others.”
Brazelton is right: children and parents alike are over-booked, over-burdened and constantly rushing from one place to another — school, work, and “extras” like sports, dance, music or religious classes. How can families possibly add one more thing to their “to do” lists? Luckily, it’s easier than you think.
Lead by example: As with most important life lessons, children learn best by example: by observing and listening to the adults in their lives. Let your child hear you using polite words and see you demonstrating consideration for others during your daily interactions.
Start young: Even 2-year-olds can get into the habit of saying “please” and “thank you.”
Show respect in return: Treat your child with the same politeness you do an adult. Let them experience the good feelings of being on the receiving side of courtesy, respect and appreciation.
Don’t expect perfection: Expect manners meltdowns. There will be times when even the most polite child — or adult — forgets her manners, or, even worse, is downright rude. This is especially true as children become older and more independent. Correct them privately, calmly, but firmly. Turn it into a learning experience and not an opportunity to humiliate.   
Unlike that “extra” fish fork, manners shouldn’t be reserved only for company or special occasions. Children should learn manners at home and school right alongside reading, writing, math and all the other essential subjects needed for living a productive and satisfying life.
Ms. Kulick is President & CEO of Educating Communities for Parenting and a founding member of the Pennsylvania Parenting Coalition.
Manners Shmanners
Before we get all up in it, I’m sure we can all agree some manners are important. There are the basic, vital ones, then the over-the-top, “manners are my hobby” ones. It’s the importance placed on hobby-manners that tans my hide.
First, let’s talk table manners. We have simple needs at our house. I want to eat without being repulsed. My family should be able to sit at a table, have a meal and chat. If you go to someone’s house and they provide you with a plate, cutlery, drink and food but you notice the salad fork is in the wrong place, you’re doing it wrong. Being a manners enthusiast is a wonderful thing, but sometimes you really need to let stuff go. Also, talking during a meal creates gas in your belly. Kids have trouble with that. We talk during all our meals, so that’s a friendly warning. You’re welcome!
A manners fail that I am guilty of is gift-shame situations. The kid gets a gift, unwraps it, clearly loves it, forgets to verbally say “Thank you” though the gratitude is obvious, and I say, “What do you say?” And there, a beautiful gift-receiving situation is deflated. Sure, there’s still fun to be had, but I just took the shine off. Ideally, before a gift situation, I’d remind my kid to look people in the eye, acknowledge them and thank them. Or I’d mention it afterwards. Right there in front of everyone is crappy timing. And yep, I’m guilty of that for sure.
Potty talk and swearing are two sides of the same gorgeous coin. Potty talk is fun and funny. Little kids, and many adults, love saying “poop.” I just try to grasp the rules at someone else’s house and then let my kids in on it before we arrive. As in, “Now, you know they don’t like poop-talk and burping, so try to maintain.”
Swearing is potty talk’s glamorous older cousin. My youngest children haven’t tried swearing yet, but I’m ready for it. I don’t mind a sprinkle here and there, but if you decide to brave these waters, keep it to the pedestrian swears. (I have an older kid and didn’t heed this advice. Learn from my mistakes!) S-words, D-words and the H-word are fine with me occasionally. A person who knows how and when to use swear words properly is a well-rounded speaker.
You knew I’d get to door etiquette, right? THIS one causes so much grief. If you’re a grown woman with working arms and you actually wait for someone to open the door, you’ve jammed the machine. You’ve halted the flow and made it all about you, which is exactly the opposite of manners. The first person to the door opens the door. That’s it. If that person then decides to hold it for the next person, kudos! If you are through the door first and don’t hold it for me, I forgive you. That’s because I let my kids burp at the table. It evens out.
And that’s the point, right? If you remember to put your napkin in your lap but ditch in line, your manners still stink. Manners teach us the value of working together. It’s why kids have to learn to wait their turn and think of the group instead of their own desires. As a parent, I need to wait my turn, quit tailgating and just try a little friendliness. There are days when that’s all I can really handle.
Amy Dalrymple Murphy is a professional crafter, mom and wife in Lewis Center, Ohio who struggles with teaching her kids manners on the regular. Find her work at madebyamyd.com

    Parenting Perspectives: Manners

       

    Two parents offer different views on the subject of manners.

    More Manners, Please!

    Do manners still matter? Of course they do — now more than ever before!

    Perhaps sometimes the disagreement on this topic is in the details. When you think of teaching children manners, what do you think of first — teaching them to use the proper fork for fish, or teaching them to react to others with empathy and warmth? The manners that truly matter are those that help children to succeed, and to live richer and kinder lives.

    The importance of manners is a topic that receives serious attention from experts like Dr. Pier Forni, co-founder of the Civility Project at Johns Hopkins University, which examines the significance of civility, manners and politeness in contemporary society; and Dr. Berry Brazelton, noted pediatrician, author and Director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

    Continue Reading →

  6. Sep 26
     Screen Time: Think What, When & Why, Not How Much
Isn’t it odd that a child can read a magazine, color in an activity book, write a letter to Grandma, or devour a chapter book … and we never say she’s getting too much “page time?”
NFL Player Gives Daughter Pre-Surgery Pep Talk
As his 4-year-old daughter headed to cancer surgery on Thursday, Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Devon Still was like a coach getting her ready for the big game. 
Parents Prioritize Responsibility and Hard Work Over Empathy in Children, Survey Finds
A new report from the Pew Research Center reveals that parents aren’t so different from one another after all.
Watch This Boy Do the Sleepy Dance
This poor fella can hardly keep his eyes open.
Stop What You’re Doing and Watch This Girl Meow Like a Cat
Prepare yourself for 8 seconds of adorableness.  

    Screen Time: Think What, When & Why, Not How Much

    Isn’t it odd that a child can read a magazine, color in an activity book, write a letter to Grandma, or devour a chapter book … and we never say she’s getting too much “page time?”

    NFL Player Gives Daughter Pre-Surgery Pep Talk

    As his 4-year-old daughter headed to cancer surgery on Thursday, Cincinnati Bengals defensive tackle Devon Still was like a coach getting her ready for the big game. 

    Parents Prioritize Responsibility and Hard Work Over Empathy in Children, Survey Finds

    A new report from the Pew Research Center reveals that parents aren’t so different from one another after all.

    Watch This Boy Do the Sleepy Dance

    This poor fella can hardly keep his eyes open.

    Stop What You’re Doing and Watch This Girl Meow Like a Cat

    Prepare yourself for 8 seconds of adorableness.  

  7. Sep 16
    Screen Time: Think What, When & Why, Not How Much   Isn’t it odd that a child can read a magazine, color in an activity book, write a letter to Grandma, devour a chapter book, laugh at a comic strip, snuggle through a favorite picture book for the umpteenth time, or do homework … and we never say she’s getting too much “page time?”
Today, electronic devices deliver equally diverse and enriching experiences, but when it comes to “screen time,” some experts still recommend doling it out by volume, not content.
Communication apps enable children to see and talk with distant friends or relatives, even sharing a book or animating a story together, across the miles;
Smartphone cameras help kids capture and relive family outings (and give parents insight into what engaged their child);
eBooks can replicate print versions; deepen insight into non-fiction topics through print, images and films; or invite play within a fantasy world;
Creativity programs provide a bottomless box of blocks, or an art set that never breaks or dries out (or draws on walls); and
Children learn about the world through narrative, and TV and movies offer stories – real and fictional – that engage, inform, educate and inspire, for kids alone or for family co-viewing.
Given this range and depth, I believe screen time is an outdated term, and that parents can — almost always — shelve the timer and look instead at what’s being consumed (or created!).
Context (when, where and why a device is being used) is as important as content. The tablet that is soothing at a doctor’s office may be disruptive in a restaurant. On a third consecutive snow day, parents may be grateful for TV shows they’d deny on a sunny day. The world’s biggest research libraries — Google and YouTube — are invaluable when kids discover a frog in the yard.
 [[MORE]]Still, children must live in balance, and time limits may make sense if electronics overwhelm a child’s other choices. Kids need active gameplay and exercise, social time with friends or siblings, fantasy play, and exploration in the real world.
Digital and physical experiences should supplement, not replace, each other. Kids need first-hand sensory experiences — drawing with real crayons, throwing an actual ball, turning the pages of a paper magazine, cooking with foods they can then eat.
Most important, every family is different, and parents are best equipped to keep their children’s lives in balance and moderation. Whatever screen time they choose to allow should be wisely invested, using their family values and knowledge of their own children’s needs, interests and abilities to define quality in content and context.
David W. Kleeman is PlayCollective’s SVP of Insights Programs and PlayVangelist; previously, he headed the American Center for Children and Media. Strategist, analyst, author and speaker, Kleeman works worldwide to promote best practices in children’s and family media, technology and products.  
Kleeman is advisory board chair to the international children’s TV festival and a Governor of the Television Academy. He was a 2013 Senior Fellow of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media.

    Screen Time: Think What, When & Why, Not How Much

       

    Isn’t it odd that a child can read a magazine, color in an activity book, write a letter to Grandma, devour a chapter book, laugh at a comic strip, snuggle through a favorite picture book for the umpteenth time, or do homework … and we never say she’s getting too much “page time?”

    Today, electronic devices deliver equally diverse and enriching experiences, but when it comes to “screen time,” some experts still recommend doling it out by volume, not content.

    • Communication apps enable children to see and talk with distant friends or relatives, even sharing a book or animating a story together, across the miles;
    • Smartphone cameras help kids capture and relive family outings (and give parents insight into what engaged their child);
    • eBooks can replicate print versions; deepen insight into non-fiction topics through print, images and films; or invite play within a fantasy world;
    • Creativity programs provide a bottomless box of blocks, or an art set that never breaks or dries out (or draws on walls); and
    • Children learn about the world through narrative, and TV and movies offer stories – real and fictional – that engage, inform, educate and inspire, for kids alone or for family co-viewing.

    Given this range and depth, I believe screen time is an outdated term, and that parents can — almost always — shelve the timer and look instead at what’s being consumed (or created!).

    Context (when, where and why a device is being used) is as important as content. The tablet that is soothing at a doctor’s office may be disruptive in a restaurant. On a third consecutive snow day, parents may be grateful for TV shows they’d deny on a sunny day. The world’s biggest research libraries — Google and YouTube — are invaluable when kids discover a frog in the yard.

    Continue Reading →

  8. Sep 12
     Kindergarten: Will She Like It?
Picking up your child during the first week of kindergarten can be nerve-racking. Will she gush with the events of the day or complain that it was terrible? Danielle Herzog’s daughter gave mixed reviews.
46 Birth Photos That Are Worth Having A Baby For
These images prove it.
Bored Kid Visits the White House
In this Oval Office photo taken June 23rd, President Barack Obama visits with a departing United States Secret Service agent and his wife. But where’s his son?
The Apparently Kid Gets a New Favorite Word
He’s over apparently, apparently.
Bilingual Babies Benefit from Learning Faster
The benefits of growing up in a bilingual home start early and are broader than previously thought, new research shows. At just six months old, infants who are exposed to more than one language have an edge over their monolingual peers.

    Kindergarten: Will She Like It?

    Picking up your child during the first week of kindergarten can be nerve-racking. Will she gush with the events of the day or complain that it was terrible? Danielle Herzog’s daughter gave mixed reviews.

    46 Birth Photos That Are Worth Having A Baby For

    These images prove it.

    Bored Kid Visits the White House

    In this Oval Office photo taken June 23rd, President Barack Obama visits with a departing United States Secret Service agent and his wife. But where’s his son?

    The Apparently Kid Gets a New Favorite Word

    He’s over apparently, apparently.

    Bilingual Babies Benefit from Learning Faster

    The benefits of growing up in a bilingual home start early and are broader than previously thought, new research shows. At just six months old, infants who are exposed to more than one language have an edge over their monolingual peers.

  9. Sep 5
     Smile and Cry at These 12 Happy-Sad Moments of Parenting

From kindergarten to college, there are moments that make you swell with joy and moments that make you tear up like a baby. And then there are moments when you do both.

Enjoy These Photos of Kids and Their Pets
Children + animals = A whole lot of adorable.
See This Baby Experience Her First Space Shuttle Launch
Prepare yourself for cuteness in 3…2…1…
Learn How to Teach Children Empathy
After the release of a recent report, many parents were surprised to learn that kids value academic achievement and individual happiness over caring for others. Here are five suggestions for developing empathy in children.
Find Out How Babies’ Eating Patterns Affect Their Diets Later On
What infants eat could have a lasting influence on their weight and food preferences throughout childhood, according to a new collection of studies that suggest babies’ eating patterns in their first 12 months of life affect their diet for years to come.

    Smile and Cry at These 12 Happy-Sad Moments of Parenting

    From kindergarten to college, there are moments that make you swell with joy and moments that make you tear up like a baby. And then there are moments when you do both.

    Enjoy These Photos of Kids and Their Pets

    Children + animals = A whole lot of adorable.

    See This Baby Experience Her First Space Shuttle Launch

    Prepare yourself for cuteness in 3…2…1…

    Learn How to Teach Children Empathy

    After the release of a recent report, many parents were surprised to learn that kids value academic achievement and individual happiness over caring for others. Here are five suggestions for developing empathy in children.

    Find Out How Babies’ Eating Patterns Affect Their Diets Later On

    What infants eat could have a lasting influence on their weight and food preferences throughout childhood, according to a new collection of studies that suggest babies’ eating patterns in their first 12 months of life affect their diet for years to come.

  10. Aug 29
     Watch Babies Experiencing Things for the First Time
Tunnels, snow and puppets may not seem that exciting to you and me, but these babies think otherwise.See What Happens When Kids Ditch Smartphones for Outdoor Fun
Electronics and digital communication have their benefits, but so does in-person social interaction.
Laugh at the Hourly Updates Nervous Parents Received from FriendsErica and Hannes do not have a child, so when friends asked them to babysit, they were given an “extensive briefing” on what to do. Then they proceeded to send hourly updates…
Listen to This Adorable Dad and Daughter Duet 
We especially love what happens around the 1:15 mark.Hilarious to Heartwarming: 14 Creative Baby Announcements
What are other great ways for families to share the news that they’re expecting?

    Watch Babies Experiencing Things for the First Time

    Tunnels, snow and puppets may not seem that exciting to you and me, but these babies think otherwise.

    See What Happens When Kids Ditch Smartphones for Outdoor Fun

    Electronics and digital communication have their benefits, but so does in-person social interaction.

    Laugh at the Hourly Updates Nervous Parents Received from Friends
    Erica and Hannes do not have a child, so when friends asked them to babysit, they were given an “extensive briefing” on what to do. Then they proceeded to send hourly updates…

    Listen to This Adorable Dad and Daughter Duet

    We especially love what happens around the 1:15 mark.

    Hilarious to Heartwarming: 14 Creative Baby Announcements

    What are other great ways for families to share the news that they’re expecting?