1. Apr 18
    Darling Girl Calms Newborn Sister
When big sister Jessica meets her newborn sister for the first time, something adorable happens. Little Vanessa began to cry, but big sis sweetly assured her that she was fine. (via youtube.com)
Double the Cute! Baby, Dog Wear Matching Outfits in Adorable Photo Series
There’s nothing quite like the bond between a little boy and his four-legged friend. And, thanks to a mom and her camera, the rest of the world can enjoy the adorableness that’s become an Internet sensation. (via today.com)
Why Babies Cry at Night
Harvard University biology professor David Haig has a new perspective on babies nighttime crying. (via npr.org)
These Adorable Babies Are Really, Really Happy Daddy Is Home
The youngsters’ joyous reactions to their fathers walking through the door will warm your heart. (via metro.co.uk)

    Darling Girl Calms Newborn Sister

    When big sister Jessica meets her newborn sister for the first time, something adorable happens. Little Vanessa began to cry, but big sis sweetly assured her that she was fine. (via youtube.com)

    Double the Cute! Baby, Dog Wear Matching Outfits in Adorable Photo Series

    There’s nothing quite like the bond between a little boy and his four-legged friend. And, thanks to a mom and her camera, the rest of the world can enjoy the adorableness that’s become an Internet sensation. (via today.com)

    Why Babies Cry at Night

    Harvard University biology professor David Haig has a new perspective on babies nighttime crying. (via npr.org)

    These Adorable Babies Are Really, Really Happy Daddy Is Home

    The youngsters’ joyous reactions to their fathers walking through the door will warm your heart. (via metro.co.uk)

  2. Apr 15
    It’s the Happy Family Baby Goodies Giveaway!   Enter for your chance to win a tote full of organic goodies and more, just for baby, from Happy Family.

    It’s the Happy Family Baby Goodies Giveaway!

       
  3. Apr 11
    Boy Plays with Otter
Or is the otter playing with the boy? (via youtube.com)
Project to Improve Poor Children’s Intellect Led to Better Health, Data Show
In 1972, researchers in North Carolina started following two groups of babies from poor families. Forty-two years later, the researchers found something that they had not expected to see. (via nytimes.com)
Teacher Fulfills a Lifelong Promise
Remember that funny assignment in 9th grade where you had to write a letter to yourself in 20 years? Bruce Farrer, a retired high school teacher in Canada does, and he’s mailing the many thousands of notes he’s saved throughout the years to all his former students in order to fulfill a lifelong promise. (via sunnyskyz.com)
These Babies Are Sweet and Sour
Toronto based filmmakers produce a hysterical online film that shows babies’ reactions to eating a slice of lemon. (via nydailynews.com)

    Boy Plays with Otter

    Or is the otter playing with the boy? (via youtube.com)

    Project to Improve Poor Children’s Intellect Led to Better Health, Data Show

    In 1972, researchers in North Carolina started following two groups of babies from poor families. Forty-two years later, the researchers found something that they had not expected to see. (via nytimes.com)

    Teacher Fulfills a Lifelong Promise

    Remember that funny assignment in 9th grade where you had to write a letter to yourself in 20 years? Bruce Farrer, a retired high school teacher in Canada does, and he’s mailing the many thousands of notes he’s saved throughout the years to all his former students in order to fulfill a lifelong promise. (via sunnyskyz.com)

    These Babies Are Sweet and Sour

    Toronto based filmmakers produce a hysterical online film that shows babies’ reactions to eating a slice of lemon. (via nydailynews.com)

  4. Apr 8
    Incorporating Math into Daily Activities   When we set the table, count change, or decide which food item is a better value, we are doing the math of everyday life. When children can count to ten or more, people sometimes say, “They know their numbers!” But knowing what those numbers mean is more complicated. It takes much practice manipulating sets of objects before children truly understand the concept of number.
Fingerplays and songs are great ways to do math. When you use your fingers to demonstrate the action in the classic fingerplay “Ten Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed,” children can see what happens when you subtract one from a bigger number. When a child holds up three fingers to tell how old she is, she probably won’t say, “Oh, look! Three is less than five!” But she is beginning to see the difference between three and five.
Each day, there are simple ways to help your kids learn more about numbers. Count together as you move markers on a board game. Set the table and make sure you have an equal number of forks and spoons. Notice what happens to a set of three cookies after eating one. Before you know it, you’ll be having fun doing math together!
How do you incorporate math into your daily activities?
  Posted By Kathleen Hayes

    Incorporating Math into Daily Activities

       

    When we set the table, count change, or decide which food item is a better value, we are doing the math of everyday life. When children can count to ten or more, people sometimes say, “They know their numbers!” But knowing what those numbers mean is more complicated. It takes much practice manipulating sets of objects before children truly understand the concept of number.

    Fingerplays and songs are great ways to do math. When you use your fingers to demonstrate the action in the classic fingerplay “Ten Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed,” children can see what happens when you subtract one from a bigger number. When a child holds up three fingers to tell how old she is, she probably won’t say, “Oh, look! Three is less than five!” But she is beginning to see the difference between three and five.

    Each day, there are simple ways to help your kids learn more about numbers. Count together as you move markers on a board game. Set the table and make sure you have an equal number of forks and spoons. Notice what happens to a set of three cookies after eating one. Before you know it, you’ll be having fun doing math together!

    How do you incorporate math into your daily activities?

    Posted By Kathleen Hayes
  5. Apr 4
    Kids Asked What They Would Do if They Had 5 More Years to Live
After listening to what these kids will do with five extra years, it’s really hard to deny them that time. Let’s work on giving them the lifespan they deserve. (via upworthy.com)
Little Girl Finds a New Best Friend – Her Shadow
As a little kid, you discover new things every single day. One toddler was captured having a major revelation about something that was right underneath her all along — her shadow! (via yahoo.com)
Artist Turns Babies’ Head-Shaping Helmets into Impressive Works of Art
Paula Strawn paints for a living, but she doesn’t need an easel or paper — the California woman decorates corrective helmets for infants with beautiful, customized designs. (via huffingtonpost.com)
Mom Teaches Baby to Say First Word
A mom and her adorable baby share a joyful moment over a very first word. The moms reaction and then the baby laughing… priceless. (via sunnyskyz.com)
10 Profound Children’s Book Quotes That Probably Changed Your Life 
Think back to the books you read as a kid—chances are there was that one line from that one book that completely changed the way you thought about life, whether it was the poignant last phrase of The Polar Express or a quietly wise revelation from Winnie the Pooh. (via parade.com)

    Kids Asked What They Would Do if They Had 5 More Years to Live

    After listening to what these kids will do with five extra years, it’s really hard to deny them that time. Let’s work on giving them the lifespan they deserve. (via upworthy.com)

    Little Girl Finds a New Best Friend – Her Shadow

    As a little kid, you discover new things every single day. One toddler was captured having a major revelation about something that was right underneath her all along — her shadow! (via yahoo.com)

    Artist Turns Babies’ Head-Shaping Helmets into Impressive Works of Art

    Paula Strawn paints for a living, but she doesn’t need an easel or paper — the California woman decorates corrective helmets for infants with beautiful, customized designs. (via huffingtonpost.com)

    Mom Teaches Baby to Say First Word

    A mom and her adorable baby share a joyful moment over a very first word. The moms reaction and then the baby laughing… priceless. (via sunnyskyz.com)

    10 Profound Children’s Book Quotes That Probably Changed Your Life 

    Think back to the books you read as a kid—chances are there was that one line from that one book that completely changed the way you thought about life, whether it was the poignant last phrase of The Polar Express or a quietly wise revelation from Winnie the Pooh. (via parade.com)

  6. Apr 3
    When Poetry Knocks on the Door   One thing I’ve come to believe for sure: children and poetry are a natural fit. Both love to play.  Both love to pretend.  A child is a fireman, a cook, an office worker, a teacher, a spy, or a superhero creating their own world of make-believe. Poems, too, are make-believe of a different sort; sweet and wild bits of imagination on the page.

As a child, we didn’t have poetry books around our house, but we had nursery rhymes, and jump rope rhymes, and the treasured “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” as well as the exuberant song “London Bridge Is Falling Down.” And oh, how I embraced the familiarity of them all; the rhythm and  rhymes and whimsical words.

When I began to write poetry for children, I never thought of it as “children’s poetry.” Even though I was writing about snowmen and stars, muffins and moons and other whimsical and magical things, I never thought of it as just children’s poetry, but poetry plain and true.

Poetry inspires young imaginations and creativity. It nudges a child to look at something in a new way. The world is full of metaphors, and children have a natural way of spotting them, but reading poetry encourages them to notice and find these comparisons.

A poem can be many things to a child; a good laugh, a good cry, a safe place.  A poem can be a child’s best friend when they need one, or a  candle of light in a dark place. And what better reason to encourage children to open the door —- when poetry knocks.
 Rebecca Kai Dotlich is a children’s poet and picture book author who grew up in the Midwest exploring trails by the creek, reading comic books, making paper dolls and building snowmen. She gives poetry workshops, visits classrooms across the country, and speaks at conferences, retreats, libraries and schools to teachers, aspiring writers and students of all ages.

    When Poetry Knocks on the Door

       

    One thing I’ve come to believe for sure: children and poetry are a natural fit. Both love to play.  Both love to pretend.  A child is a fireman, a cook, an office worker, a teacher, a spy, or a superhero creating their own world of make-believe. Poems, too, are make-believe of a different sort; sweet and wild bits of imagination on the page.

    As a child, we didn’t have poetry books around our house, but we had nursery rhymes, and jump rope rhymes, and the treasured “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” as well as the exuberant song “London Bridge Is Falling Down.” And oh, how I embraced the familiarity of them all; the rhythm and  rhymes and whimsical words.

    When I began to write poetry for children, I never thought of it as “children’s poetry.” Even though I was writing about snowmen and stars, muffins and moons and other whimsical and magical things, I never thought of it as just children’s poetry, but poetry plain and true.

    Poetry inspires young imaginations and creativity. It nudges a child to look at something in a new way. The world is full of metaphors, and children have a natural way of spotting them, but reading poetry encourages them to notice and find these comparisons.

    A poem can be many things to a child; a good laugh, a good cry, a safe place.  A poem can be a child’s best friend when they need one, or a  candle of light in a dark place. And what better reason to encourage children to open the door —- when poetry knocks.

    Rebecca Kai Dotlich is a children’s poet and picture book author who grew up in the Midwest exploring trails by the creek, reading comic books, making paper dolls and building snowmen. She gives poetry workshops, visits classrooms across the country, and speaks at conferences, retreats, libraries and schools to teachers, aspiring writers and students of all ages.

  7. Apr 2
    Natural Easter Egg Dye   Does your family dye hard-boiled eggs every year for Easter? This year, try making your own natural dyes using food and drinks found in your kitchen.To make a dye from vegetables, simmer equal parts water and a vegetable of choice. You can experiment with different vegetables to get different colors. We’ve found that the brown, dry skin of an onion makes a golden color. The green tops of carrots or beets produce a pale green. Celery leaves make yellow.For a blue dye, mash blueberries and simmer them in a few inches of water.Certain drinks also work as natural dyes. Coffee right out of the pot makes brown, while tea makes tan. For a soft lilac, use grape juice.Place an egg into a dye and turn it over with a spoon to dye all its sides. Once the egg has reached a shade you like, remove the egg from the dye and dry it on a paper towel.


 By Lee Bock

    Natural Easter Egg Dye

       

    Does your family dye hard-boiled eggs every year for Easter? This year, try making your own natural dyes using food and drinks found in your kitchen.

    1. To make a dye from vegetables, simmer equal parts water and a vegetable of choice. You can experiment with different vegetables to get different colors. We’ve found that the brown, dry skin of an onion makes a golden color. The green tops of carrots or beets produce a pale green. Celery leaves make yellow.
    2. For a blue dye, mash blueberries and simmer them in a few inches of water.
    3. Certain drinks also work as natural dyes. Coffee right out of the pot makes brown, while tea makes tan. For a soft lilac, use grape juice.
    4. Place an egg into a dye and turn it over with a spoon to dye all its sides. Once the egg has reached a shade you like, remove the egg from the dye and dry it on a paper towel.

    By Lee Bock

  8. Apr 2

    flowisaconstruct:

    "Well, the numbers don’t lie. I’m a Goofus, not a Gallant"

  9. Apr 1
    There are 12 objects hidden in this picture. How many can you find?
Need help? Get the answers: http://buff.ly/1jTSDqw 

    There are 12 objects hidden in this picture. How many can you find?

    Need help? Get the answers: http://buff.ly/1jTSDqw
     

  10. Mar 31
    The Troll That Made Reading Fun   I love reading to kids. I love to try to guess what books and stories different kids will like. Sometimes my guesses are right, and sometimes they’re way off. And the great thing about kids is that they don’t waste any time in letting you know exactly how they feel about something!
Every now and then, I experience the thrill of seeing a child really connect to a particular book. This happened recently with my 3-year-old nephew. He loves being read to, and he’ll always pick out books for me to read to him. But he had never asked for a certain book before; instead, he’d choose from whatever books were available.
About a month ago, I came across the book Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson. In it, a good-mannered troll swaps places with a “troll-mannered” girl. My nephew’s reaction to it was similar to his older siblings’ reaction to Eloise by Kay Thompson when I first read it to them. In both cases, the kids were fascinated by the displays of bad behavior, but understood that they shouldn’t act that way themselves.
A week after I read Troll Swap to my nephew (three times, at his insistence), I saw him again. As soon as I walked in the door, he asked me, “Did you bring the troll book?” I was delighted. “No,” I said, “but I promise I will next time.” The following week, I read the book to him twice, then I asked him to read it to me. He went through it page by page and told me the whole story in his own words, embellishing it with details from his own life and “lessons” he learned from his parents and teacher (“Now be a good troll and use your listening ears”). For the first time I’d ever seen, my nephew identified each letter in a word for me and told me what word the letters spelled. The word was all caps in a speech balloon: BURP! Hey, whatever it takes to get a kid reading!
Hours later, when we were all going home, my nephew grabbed the book and ran over to me. He said, “Can I take this to my home? Because I love it.” It was one of my favorite moments ever.
Our libraries are filled with wonderful books, and guessing which ones kids will zero in on is my favorite game. What books do your kids love?
 Photo courtesy of nosycrow.com  Posted By Judy Burke

    The Troll That Made Reading Fun

       

    I love reading to kids. I love to try to guess what books and stories different kids will like. Sometimes my guesses are right, and sometimes they’re way off. And the great thing about kids is that they don’t waste any time in letting you know exactly how they feel about something!

    Every now and then, I experience the thrill of seeing a child really connect to a particular book. This happened recently with my 3-year-old nephew. He loves being read to, and he’ll always pick out books for me to read to him. But he had never asked for a certain book before; instead, he’d choose from whatever books were available.

    About a month ago, I came across the book Troll Swap by Leigh Hodgkinson. In it, a good-mannered troll swaps places with a “troll-mannered” girl. My nephew’s reaction to it was similar to his older siblings’ reaction to Eloise by Kay Thompson when I first read it to them. In both cases, the kids were fascinated by the displays of bad behavior, but understood that they shouldn’t act that way themselves.

    A week after I read Troll Swap to my nephew (three times, at his insistence), I saw him again. As soon as I walked in the door, he asked me, “Did you bring the troll book?” I was delighted. “No,” I said, “but I promise I will next time.” The following week, I read the book to him twice, then I asked him to read it to me. He went through it page by page and told me the whole story in his own words, embellishing it with details from his own life and “lessons” he learned from his parents and teacher (“Now be a good troll and use your listening ears”). For the first time I’d ever seen, my nephew identified each letter in a word for me and told me what word the letters spelled. The word was all caps in a speech balloon: BURP! Hey, whatever it takes to get a kid reading!

    Hours later, when we were all going home, my nephew grabbed the book and ran over to me. He said, “Can I take this to my home? Because I love it.” It was one of my favorite moments ever.

    Our libraries are filled with wonderful books, and guessing which ones kids will zero in on is my favorite game. What books do your kids love?

    Photo courtesy of nosycrow.com

    Posted By Judy Burke