1. Jul 18
     Baby’s Best Friend
At only a fraction of their size, these little babies love their big ol’ dogs.How Overparenting Makes Kids Overwieght
Is helicopter parenting playing a role in obesity among kids? A new study says “yes.”How do you keep your kids safe on social media?
The online world and kids is a world that parents have only started to navigate, and it’s not going away. So while kids are there, let’s keep them safe.Hundreds Show Up for 8 Year Old’s Free Front Yard Concert
8 years old. 400 people gathered in the rain. That’s how you put on a concert!Teaching 4-Year-Olds To Feel Better
You’re 4 years old, building a block tower. Another kid runs up and knocks it down. What do you do? A) Tell her that’s against the rules. B) Go tell a teacher. C) Hit her. D) Start to cry. E) What did you say again? A recently released study asserts it’s possible to teach kids in preschool to give better answers to that question.

    Baby’s Best Friend

    At only a fraction of their size, these little babies love their big ol’ dogs.

    How Overparenting Makes Kids Overwieght

    Is helicopter parenting playing a role in obesity among kids? A new study says “yes.”

    How do you keep your kids safe on social media?

    The online world and kids is a world that parents have only started to navigate, and it’s not going away. So while kids are there, let’s keep them safe.

    Hundreds Show Up for 8 Year Old’s Free Front Yard Concert

    8 years old. 400 people gathered in the rain. That’s how you put on a concert!

    Teaching 4-Year-Olds To Feel Better

    You’re 4 years old, building a block tower. Another kid runs up and knocks it down. What do you do? A) Tell her that’s against the rules. B) Go tell a teacher. C) Hit her. D) Start to cry. E) What did you say again? A recently released study asserts it’s possible to teach kids in preschool to give better answers to that question.

  2. Jul 11
    Read How Over-Scheduling Kids May be Detrimental to Their DevelopmentA new study suggests that kids may need a little more latitude with their free time instead of having their days packed with lessons, sports and structured activities.Hear This Boy’s Lullaby to Baby BrotherThis is a whole new level of cute.Tips to Encourage CuriosityYour baby is a born explorer. She’s curious about everything! Your face, her hands, even her blanket is fascinating! And from the time she can first grab an object, she wants to turn it over, shake it, smell it and, of course, taste it—as this is how babies learn! Adorable Boy Comforts GirlThe first day of school can be hard. Sometimes you just need a friend for support.10 Kids Who Can’t Even Handle Fireworks Right NowThere’s nothing like seeing your very first fireworks display in celebration of our great nation’s independence.

    Read How Over-Scheduling Kids May be Detrimental to Their Development
    A new study suggests that kids may need a little more latitude with their free time instead of having their days packed with lessons, sports and structured activities.

    Hear This Boy’s Lullaby to Baby Brother
    This is a whole new level of cute.

    Tips to Encourage Curiosity
    Your baby is a born explorer. She’s curious about everything! Your face, her hands, even her blanket is fascinating! And from the time she can first grab an object, she wants to turn it over, shake it, smell it and, of course, taste it—as this is how babies learn! 

    Adorable Boy Comforts Girl
    The first day of school can be hard. Sometimes you just need a friend for support.

    10 Kids Who Can’t Even Handle Fireworks Right Now
    There’s nothing like seeing your very first fireworks display in celebration of our great nation’s independence.

  3. Jul 3
     This Toddler and His Rescue Dog BFF Are Precisely What Love Looks Like

Toby is a dog. A rescue dog, to be exact; and as these photos show, he and his diaper-clad partner-in-crime are totally inseparable.

A Kid Wore WHAT in His School Photo?
When David Yearsley, 11, was taking his fifth-grade school photo, he’d thought he’d jazz things up a bit.
Why You Should Let Your Kids Eat (Some) Junk Food
You want them to eat food that can be peeled, chopped or juiced. They want something with sprinkles, sugar and enough fat to make it gooey and rich.
Toddler Gives a Wedding Toast, and It’s Just as Adorable as You’d Expect
She may only be 3 years old, but that doesn’t mean this toddler, Cleo, can give one heck of a wedding toast.
Read It and Weep: 9-Year-Old Doesn’t Need Mom for This Anymore
After almost ten years of reading together, she’s ready to give up the tradition.

    This Toddler and His Rescue Dog BFF Are Precisely What Love Looks Like

    Toby is a dog. A rescue dog, to be exact; and as these photos show, he and his diaper-clad partner-in-crime are totally inseparable.

    A Kid Wore WHAT in His School Photo?

    When David Yearsley, 11, was taking his fifth-grade school photo, he’d thought he’d jazz things up a bit.

    Why You Should Let Your Kids Eat (Some) Junk Food

    You want them to eat food that can be peeled, chopped or juiced. They want something with sprinkles, sugar and enough fat to make it gooey and rich.

    Toddler Gives a Wedding Toast, and It’s Just as Adorable as You’d Expect

    She may only be 3 years old, but that doesn’t mean this toddler, Cleo, can give one heck of a wedding toast.

    Read It and Weep: 9-Year-Old Doesn’t Need Mom for This Anymore

    After almost ten years of reading together, she’s ready to give up the tradition.

  4. Jun 30
    The Riches of Reading to Babies   “The Reading Mother” is an old poem, and I’m not sure when I first heard it. But my favorite line comes to mind whenever I see a mom reading to her child: “Richer than I you will never be—I had a mother who read to me.” Certainly, by that measure, I’m a wealthy person, as are my children.
Reading to children is such a simple thing. Almost anyone can do it. It’s low cost. It’s low tech. Yet, many of us worry that in this  digital age full of tablets and smartphones that are often handed over to children, even babies, essential basics such as books and magazines are increasingly shunned.
Decades ago educators cited reading as the most fundamental skill children acquire, and they promoted the idea that reading aloud to children is critically important. Early childhood teachers can quickly spot the students who are read to daily, as they are already on their way to becoming good future readers.
And now pediatricians are also speaking to the importance of reading to children—particularly in the first three years of their lives. In a new policy announcement, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is urging its physician members to prescribe daily read-aloud time for parents and children together. And they say this should start from infancy. Formally adding their voice to the voices of others, doctors will remind parents at office visits not to forget “the basics.” They’ll be telling parents that it’s critical to read, speak, and sing to children at the very beginning of their young lives, because that’s how they acquire vocabulary and other important pre-literacy skills that may determine later school success. 
Doctors might also talk to parents about how regular reading is essential to optimal physical development. Research shows that when children are read to, their brain cells are literally turned on. Existing links among brain cells are strengthened. New cells are formed.  Reading, as it turns out, is brain food! Maybe it’s even fair to say that no child is completely healthy if he or she has not held a book or heard a story.
In my experience, many parents and grandparents—even the wealthy and well educated—are surprised to hear the research and learn that it’s never too soon to read to babies. The AAP and others point out that low-income children are of particular concern.  Studies show that more affluent children hear millions more words spoken, read, or sung than do children from low-income homes. This “word gap” gives low-income children a clear academic disadvantage, which may be apparent as early as 18 months.  One easy way to close that word gap is exposing babies to books.
Until very recently, the national conversation about this issue has been mostly a low but persistent hum. Let’s hope that with the AAP and so many others joining in, it will now rise to the level of a clarion call: Let’s read to children. All of us. Every child. Every day. In infancy and throughout childhood—even beyond the stage when they are reading independently.
As the poet said so well long ago, mothers can make their children rich—simply by opening a book.
  Posted By Christine F. Cully

    The Riches of Reading to Babies

       

    “The Reading Mother” is an old poem, and I’m not sure when I first heard it. But my favorite line comes to mind whenever I see a mom reading to her child: “Richer than I you will never be—I had a mother who read to me.” Certainly, by that measure, I’m a wealthy person, as are my children.

    Reading to children is such a simple thing. Almost anyone can do it. It’s low cost. It’s low tech. Yet, many of us worry that in this  digital age full of tablets and smartphones that are often handed over to children, even babies, essential basics such as books and magazines are increasingly shunned.

    Decades ago educators cited reading as the most fundamental skill children acquire, and they promoted the idea that reading aloud to children is critically important. Early childhood teachers can quickly spot the students who are read to daily, as they are already on their way to becoming good future readers.

    And now pediatricians are also speaking to the importance of reading to children—particularly in the first three years of their lives. In a new policy announcement, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is urging its physician members to prescribe daily read-aloud time for parents and children together. And they say this should start from infancy. Formally adding their voice to the voices of others, doctors will remind parents at office visits not to forget “the basics.” They’ll be telling parents that it’s critical to read, speak, and sing to children at the very beginning of their young lives, because that’s how they acquire vocabulary and other important pre-literacy skills that may determine later school success. 

    Doctors might also talk to parents about how regular reading is essential to optimal physical development. Research shows that when children are read to, their brain cells are literally turned on. Existing links among brain cells are strengthened. New cells are formed.  Reading, as it turns out, is brain food! Maybe it’s even fair to say that no child is completely healthy if he or she has not held a book or heard a story.

    In my experience, many parents and grandparents—even the wealthy and well educated—are surprised to hear the research and learn that it’s never too soon to read to babies. The AAP and others point out that low-income children are of particular concern.  Studies show that more affluent children hear millions more words spoken, read, or sung than do children from low-income homes. This “word gap” gives low-income children a clear academic disadvantage, which may be apparent as early as 18 months.  One easy way to close that word gap is exposing babies to books.

    Until very recently, the national conversation about this issue has been mostly a low but persistent hum. Let’s hope that with the AAP and so many others joining in, it will now rise to the level of a clarion call: Let’s read to children. All of us. Every child. Every day. In infancy and throughout childhood—even beyond the stage when they are reading independently.

    As the poet said so well long ago, mothers can make their children rich—simply by opening a book.

    Posted By Christine F. Cully
  5. Jun 27
    Pediatricians Recommend a Daily Dose of Reading
If your child’s doctor stresses the importance of reading during your next visit, here’s why.Watch This Baby Discover His Eyebrows
Who knew eyebrows could be so funny?Read the Letter from a Google Employee’s Daughter to His Boss A little girl writes to Google and complains that her daddy gets only Saturdays off from the company. And it’s his birthday. And Google responds.Hear This Baby’s Valid (And Adorable) Argument
The couch? Her dirty diaper? His lack of diaper? Well whatever it is, she makes one heck of an argument!Study Shows Parents Value Grades Over Kindness
When your kid gets straight As, it’s cause for a celebratory dinner out. When they win a baseball game, there are loud cheers from the bleachers. But when that same kid helps an elderly neighbor with yard work, is there any kind of fanfare?

    Pediatricians Recommend a Daily Dose of Reading

    If your child’s doctor stresses the importance of reading during your next visit, here’s why.

    Watch This Baby Discover His Eyebrows

    Who knew eyebrows could be so funny?

    Read the Letter from a Google Employee’s Daughter to His Boss

    A little girl writes to Google and complains that her daddy gets only Saturdays off from the company. And it’s his birthday. And Google responds.

    Hear This Baby’s Valid (And Adorable) Argument

    The couch? Her dirty diaper? His lack of diaper? Well whatever it is, she makes one heck of an argument!

    Study Shows Parents Value Grades Over Kindness

    When your kid gets straight As, it’s cause for a celebratory dinner out. When they win a baseball game, there are loud cheers from the bleachers. But when that same kid helps an elderly neighbor with yard work, is there any kind of fanfare?

  6. Jun 20
    Dear Kids: It’s OK to Be Bored
Boredom is not a problem to be solved. It is an itch to scratch. Boredom is the dawn of ideas. Boredom is curiosity knocking gently at your mind, asking to play.

Babies Are Learning to Swim Before They Can Crawl
At the age of only 18, Harvey Barnett became determined to teach infants to swim.Watch This Dad Take His Daughter on the Best First Date Ever
Aaron Dickson, a father and husband from Bellingham, Washington, recently took his daughter, Analynne, on her “first real date.” 
Can Classic Moral Stories Promote Honesty in Children?
In a study by researchers from Psychological Science, children were read different “moral” stories and put into a situation where they could lie or tell the truth.
More Women Keeping the Bun in the Oven
According to a new study by the CDC, more moms are letting nature take its course instead of inducing labor.

    Dear Kids: It’s OK to Be Bored

    Boredom is not a problem to be solved. It is an itch to scratch. Boredom is the dawn of ideas. Boredom is curiosity knocking gently at your mind, asking to play.

    Babies Are Learning to Swim Before They Can Crawl

    At the age of only 18, Harvey Barnett became determined to teach infants to swim.

    Watch This Dad Take His Daughter on the Best First Date Ever

    Aaron Dickson, a father and husband from Bellingham, Washington, recently took his daughter, Analynne, on her “first real date.”

    Can Classic Moral Stories Promote Honesty in Children?

    In a study by researchers from Psychological Science, children were read different “moral” stories and put into a situation where they could lie or tell the truth.

    More Women Keeping the Bun in the Oven

    According to a new study by the CDC, more moms are letting nature take its course instead of inducing labor.

  7. Jun 18

    Confessions of a (Reformed) Helicopter Mom

    Last weekend, my husband I were totally flummoxed by a robin who crashed into our dining room window over and over again.

    We were desperate to help. We tried taping paper over the two window panes the bird favored, but the bird simply chose other window panes to attack. In total, that robin flew into our window about a hundred times, based on the number of beak marks left on the glass. Shades of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, I said, shuddering. The definition of insanity, my husband said, shaking his head.

    Then we found the nest in a nearby tree.

    Aha! The bird was not evil. The bird was not unwell. The bird was simply an overprotective parent. In a complete overreaction, the robin was protecting its three babies from something (its reflection?) or someone (us?) that was never a threat.

    The bizarre incident started me thinking about the similarities between that robin and me. How many times did I behave strangely, in the ruse of protecting my young children from “danger” that didn’t actually exist?

    Oh, where to begin! When my son was a toddler, he was desperate to go down the playground slide by himself. I didn’t think he was old enough. When he finally wriggled out of my grasp and climbed up the ladder so fast I couldn’t catch him, I held my breath as he whooshed down the slide, landing triumphantly on his tiny feet. The look of joy and satisfaction on his face was unforgettable. Did I feel silly? You bet. 

    And when his kindergarten teacher announced that the kids in her classroom would be carving their own jack-o’-lanterns (with carving knives designed for kids, but, hey, they were still SHARP!), I was one of several mothers who worried aloud. But my son loved the activity and felt a real sense of accomplishment—and still has all ten fingers.

    So, as you can probably guess, I’m one of those moms who would likely resist letting her kids play in an environment described in this article in The Atlantic, “The Overprotected Kid.” The play space the author describes is a far cry from traditional playgrounds. Here, kids engage with objects such as spare tires and discarded boats. The idea is to encourage kids to create their own kinds of play, take risks, and meet challenges of their own, on their own. The message is that if adults are too directive and overly protective, it’s harder for kids to develop curiosity, courage, and confidence.

    As my kids grew older, so did my understanding of this idea. I had to work hard at not becoming a helicopter mom, always hovering. Although I thought they were too young, I swallowed the lump in my throat, smiled brightly, and put them on planes unaccompanied to visit long-distance grandparents. In later years, they enjoyed fun-filled weeks at sleep-away camp (with strangers!), while at home I worried about one of them falling out of a canoe or into a campfire. But even as I was hyper-aware that sometimes bad things happen, I also knew that the odds that they’d be safe were heavily in my favor.

    Like baby birds, kids need short solo flights before they’re ready to leave the nest. They need practice being independent and judging risks.

    It all sounds so simple. Even obvious. But it’s anything but. Thoughtful parents spend a lot of time pondering where to draw the line, and we all draw it differently. Do you feel you give your children enough freedom to develop a healthy sense of independence, confidence, and courage? How can we be sure we’re not unnecessarily protecting our offspring, banging our head against glass like, well, a bird brain?  What do you think?

    Posted By Christine F. Cully
  8. Jun 13
    Learn How to Pitch Veggies the Right Way
If you often find yourself in a battle with the kids around the dinner table, you might be marketing new foods the wrong way.
3 Unforgettable Lessons from Dad
These three tips are tried, true and timeless.
What Other “Lasts” Should’ve Made the List?
No, not the last time they bring their blankie wherever they’re going, or the last time they toddle. These are 11 “lasts” to watch out for in the tween years.
Watch These Kids Open Up about Their Dads 
Fathers watch as their children tell TODAY show correspondent, Jenna Bush Hager, what they love about their dads.
We Dare You Not to Cry at This…
Released just in time for Father’s Day, the one-minute spot features 27 priceless and fleeting moments of fatherhood, from the father-daughter dance at a wedding to fixing car troubles to piggy back rides.

    Learn How to Pitch Veggies the Right Way

    If you often find yourself in a battle with the kids around the dinner table, you might be marketing new foods the wrong way.

    3 Unforgettable Lessons from Dad

    These three tips are tried, true and timeless.

    What Other “Lasts” Should’ve Made the List?

    No, not the last time they bring their blankie wherever they’re going, or the last time they toddle. These are 11 “lasts” to watch out for in the tween years.

    Watch These Kids Open Up about Their Dads

    Fathers watch as their children tell TODAY show correspondent, Jenna Bush Hager, what they love about their dads.

    We Dare You Not to Cry at This…

    Released just in time for Father’s Day, the one-minute spot features 27 priceless and fleeting moments of fatherhood, from the father-daughter dance at a wedding to fixing car troubles to piggy back rides.

  9. Jun 6
    Baby Gets the Giggles
When this 3-month-old laughs for the first time, her dad’s reaction is priceless.
Get Inspired by This Preschooler’s Graduation Speech
Preschooler Jathan Muhar got right to the point when he accepted his diploma this week in front of an audience of his peers, friends, family and teachers, and in the process, he inspires us all to dream big.
Does Handwriting Matter? 
The Common Core standards call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard. But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past.
21 Kids Who Are Too Literal For Their Own Good
The funny thing is, most of these answers could be considered correct.
That Time a Photo of My 2-Year-Old Daughter Went Viral
During her vacation, mother Julia Fierro shared a photo of her daughter sitting in a playground swing on Facebook. And then it went viral.

    Baby Gets the Giggles

    When this 3-month-old laughs for the first time, her dad’s reaction is priceless.

    Get Inspired by This Preschooler’s Graduation Speech

    Preschooler Jathan Muhar got right to the point when he accepted his diploma this week in front of an audience of his peers, friends, family and teachers, and in the process, he inspires us all to dream big.

    Does Handwriting Matter?

    The Common Core standards call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard. But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past.

    21 Kids Who Are Too Literal For Their Own Good

    The funny thing is, most of these answers could be considered correct.

    That Time a Photo of My 2-Year-Old Daughter Went Viral

    During her vacation, mother Julia Fierro shared a photo of her daughter sitting in a playground swing on Facebook. And then it went viral.

  10. May 16
    Little Girl’s Heartwarming Reaction to Baby News
These two children from Denver got one huge surprise from the Easter bunny this year. (via yahoo.com)
 Do the Building Blocks of Computer Programming Begin in Preschool?
Creative teachers are discovering effective ways to offer children a healthy blend of sensory-rich tactile investigations, artistic creativity, meaningful collaborations, and high-tech tools geared toward problem solving and documenting a child’s work/play. (via fredrogerscenter.org)
 This Is What Kids Dream About
A group of seven and eight-year-olds muse about their nightly dreams. (via youtube.com)
6-Year-Olds Celebrate Mother’s Day
Adorable six-year-olds create cards for Mother’s Day and explain what they love most about their moms. (via today.com)
This Heartfelt Message Will Bring You to Tears
Chloe and Annie Veron want the world to know how amazing their mom is, so they made this touching video for her as a Mother’s Day gift. This is their incredible story, and it requires tissues… (via sunnyskyz.com) 

    Little Girl’s Heartwarming Reaction to Baby News

    These two children from Denver got one huge surprise from the Easter bunny this year. (via yahoo.com)

     Do the Building Blocks of Computer Programming Begin in Preschool?

    Creative teachers are discovering effective ways to offer children a healthy blend of sensory-rich tactile investigations, artistic creativity, meaningful collaborations, and high-tech tools geared toward problem solving and documenting a child’s work/play. (via fredrogerscenter.org)

     This Is What Kids Dream About

    A group of seven and eight-year-olds muse about their nightly dreams. (via youtube.com)

    6-Year-Olds Celebrate Mother’s Day

    Adorable six-year-olds create cards for Mother’s Day and explain what they love most about their moms. (via today.com)

    This Heartfelt Message Will Bring You to Tears

    Chloe and Annie Veron want the world to know how amazing their mom is, so they made this touching video for her as a Mother’s Day gift. This is their incredible story, and it requires tissues… (via sunnyskyz.com